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Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

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  • Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

    Here's a little toy for everyone:

    http://www.u.arizona.edu/~jzarzyck/ScoreTemplate.xls

    I know a few programs (ours included) like to analyze member's and team's preformances from tournaments by figuring out what their averages were, what scored relatively higher or lower, etc.

    I also know this is always fairly time consuming. So finally, I got off my ass and made an Excel template to do it with. I don't know if any other schools have ones but for those that don't and would like one, I figured I'd distribute the one I made.

    Here's how it works. Start by plugging the basic data from a tournament (your team number and name, your members, who you hit) on the Preliminary Data sheet. Then, plug in all the numbers from your ballots on the Ballot Data sheet. Don't touch the Tab sheet! This is where the magic happens. =P

    You'll then get results on the two Results sheets, showing you how individuals averaged on various aspects of the case as well as how the team as a whole did.

    Now, you'll notice there are three types of averages shown for both individual and team results. The first is a raw average (mean) of the scores. It just adds scores up and divides them by the number of entries.

    The other two are both normalized scores. These scores are designed to correct for judges who us a higher or lower baseline score. The first are median-score adjusted. These are calculated by finding the median number from a judge's ballot and subtracting it from the actual scores given. The resulting number is how far above or below the median that item scored. The second set of normalized scores use "half the range" as a baseline. The highest and lowest scores on a judge's ballot are averaged to find what the middle of his range was. Then, the actual scores subtract that number to arrive at normalized scores.

    I can explain the statistical theory behind all this is people are curious, but for now, you have all three so you can figure out which one you feels best represents actual preformance.

    Anyway, I'm releasing this as a sort of freeware/open-source deal. It's my hope people might look at it and modify and improve it and share it with the community so that, eventually, we can have a really useful tool for doing data analysis of tournament preformances.

    That being said, please, also, give credit to the people that have worked on it if you distribute the file. There's a credit sheet in the back, feel free to add your name to it if you make substantial changes and want to have your name associated with it, but please don't co-opt and pretend you or someone else made it.

    Anyway, I hope everyone finds this helpful and I really hope people will take the time to try to improve things.

    Let me know if there's any errors or bugs on this thread and I'll fix them.

    Thank you.

    PS: Here's the link again:

    http://www.u.arizona.edu/~jzarzyck/ScoreTemplate.xls
    "Call on God, but row away from the rocks." - Hunter S. Thompson

  • #2
    Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks



    Jeremy Zarzycki, you're my hero.
    "Who do these people think they are coming on my perjuries and asking

    Comment


    • #3
      Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

      I agree. (I would [quote] the s but that's just gratuitous.)
      Objection: Shatner

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      • #4
        Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

        *hands Jeremy many cookies*

        that's awesome.
        "you can call us Auto Hut...it's like pizzas, only with car parts."

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        • #5
          Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

          The Score Template has been added our website for everyone to download:
          www.arizonamocktrial.com

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          • #6
            Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

            this is really nice. thank you!

            aseem
            This sentence has two erors.

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            • #7
              Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

              This seems like an excellent tool, but may I ask, only from curiosity, why you decided to release this to the public?

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              • #8
                Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                Little do you know, the spreadsheet is in fact a highly sophisticated data miner. Just by clicking the link, Jeremy has all your Mock-ralted documents! The horror! The hoooorrrooorrr!
                "Who do these people think they are coming on my perjuries and asking

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                • #9
                  Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                  Yes, it has several backdoors. I have also stolen all your credit card numbers. So I will now not only use the information to crush all your teams but I will also celebrate with a month-long trip to Rio.

                  The real reason is I didn't see any reason not to. I figured it'd be helpful to people and I was hoping others would add onto it and release it as well. I don't think it provides any real competitive advantage and I figure the more statistical information out there the better. Also, maybe it if gets widespread enough, people will start reporting box scores from tournaments and we can track scoring records. The more AMTA is like the NCAAs, the happier it makes me.
                  "Call on God, but row away from the rocks." - Hunter S. Thompson

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                  • #10
                    Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                    Dude, that's awesome. This usually takes me a couple hours.
                    But you look too young to be a lawyer.

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                    • #11
                      Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                      I will definately appreciate the spreadsheet a lot next year, this year was the first year that our team actually started to go to tourneys, we went to three this year, up from our usual one last year.
                      This spreadsheet will be helpful next year when we expect to go to about 5 or 6 tourneys, and possibly host a small one here at our school for midwest (illinois) teams.
                      Thanks a lot, and i will be sure to send it back out once i add some things to it.
                      "Its not an upset if you knew that you were the better team all along.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                        There is an updated version of the file now available for download on our website. (www.ArizonaMockTrial.com)

                        This version has only minor formatting changes, and is more printer friendly.

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                        • #13
                          Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                          I have a question regarding the order of data inserted for the opposing team, does it matter in any way as long as roles are maintained so that a direct score matches a cross score for the same type?

                          Oh and thank you very much for this useful tool!

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                          • #14
                            Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                            Order doesn't matter.
                            The other teams scores are just used to create the average scores for the rounds, as well as to show who won the ballot.

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                            • #15
                              Statistical Tool for the MT Geeks

                              Hey, that is a really awesome spreadsheet. Great work!

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