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2014 Richard Calkins Invitational Tab Summary

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  • 2014 Richard Calkins Invitational Tab Summary

    Thank you to all the teams that attended. A full tab summary is attached.

    Final Rankings (Balancing Weighted Partial Ballots)
    1 1548 Iowa A (37.878)
    2 1103 Cornell A (34.878)
    3 1104 Cornell B (33.722)
    4 1118 Washburn A (31.747)
    5 1549 Iowa B (31.208)
    6 1105 Cornell C (30.345)
    Honorable Mention
    7 1119 Washburn B (28.236)
    8 1366 Drake A (27.929)
    9 1106 Creighton A (27.395)
    10 1266 Loras A (26.425)

    A full explanation of the tabulation methods is also attached.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by captainbowtie; October 29th, 2014, 08:26 AM.
    Ray Barr (the Amazing)
    University of Minnesota Law School
    Drake University, 2014
    "Bow ties are cool."

  • #2
    I'll fully admit that I use the straight-line system I do because I don't have the mathematical know-how to do what you or Ben Graham are doing. But I am curious as to why you think that your logarithmic curve is optimal for this type of tournament, rather than Yale's. I cannot count the number of times I have seen a team get absolutely thumped and only lose a ballot by three or four points. An assumption that a -3 should be treated essentially the same as a tie, which is treated essentially the same as a +3 seems utterly counterintuitive to me.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think a four-piece curve makes more sense because it treats +1, -1 scores as being more analogous to a tie as compared to a two-piece curve. Curves with a plateau in middle still give close to .5 ballots for such scores, which I think is appropriate considering that a change of one point would result in the team tieing the ballot.

      I certainly see your point about a +3/-3 ballot having the potential to be a blowout. I think the answer to that, however, is to adjust the Base Quality Win, narrowing the points needed for a complete win, so that +3 is worth more to the winning team and -3 is worth less to the losing team. Fourteen points seems a rather large requirement for a complete win, and perhaps +7 or +10 would be more appropriate.

      If the Base Quality Win was set at 7, then a ballot of +3/-3 would fall right in the high slope area of a four-piece curve, where the partial ballots won begin to rapidly drop off.

      In summary: 1) Four-piece curve makes sense because of how it treats almost ties more like ties than a two-piece curve does. 2) Treatment of +3/-3 scores suggests a need to adjust the width of the curve (by adjusting the quality win), not modifying the shape of the curve.
      Ray Barr (the Amazing)
      University of Minnesota Law School
      Drake University, 2014
      "Bow ties are cool."

      Comment

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